NOTHING MUCH

IZZY AND ME IN ULMARRA 2009

Do you think I will ever laugh light heartedly again ?

ITS the month in which my sister died. I understand a good deal now of what people mean about getting old. The Buffer Zone gone and now the Peers disappearing. Lovers and Parents and Siblings and friends. And there are times of Sorrowing.

So there should be. People are not disposable razors. Sometimes I need to sit awhile and call OCHA ! OCHA !

Sometimes I need the sackcloth and ashes.

tearless

wordless

alone

tearless

 

And one day I just might laugh light heartedly again.

THE JOYS AND DIFFICULTIES OF AN ATTEMPT TO RECOVER A LIFE.

 

Here is an extract from Izzy’s PhD work.  He said he was re-membering this woman. That’s what I am doing with myself – this woman , Lynne. Now that so much is broken, gone , damaged. That is why I photograph myself so much. Why I focus on the small things , the minutiae  of each day. Sieving through. Sorting mud, Fool’s gold and true gold. Re-building my self. Re-creating a life.

An entirely successful literary/critical biography can never be written, if the numerous theoretical points-of-view on the subject are to be believed. This site will try to explain the joys and difficulties of an attempt to recover a life – that of Melinda Kendall, mother of Henry Kendall, celebrated nineteenth century Australian poet, and a published writer in her own right – using her body of work as a way of informing a biographical representation, as well as utilising archival and biographical information to inform an analysis of her work. Though this process may seem to bring two methods / theories of literary criticism – New Historicism and Cultural Materialism – into conflict, the resultant two-way flow between non-literary, archival material and Melinda Kendall’s creative output could prove valuable in an attempt to represent a life made almost invisible by the glow of Henry Kendall’s celebrity. Many factors have contributed to Melinda Kendall’s exclusion from Australian literary history, including her geographic isolation in the Illawarra, her position as a woman in nineteenth-century patriarchal society, and her relegation to the margins of her more-famous son’s story. This site will be dedicated to describing an attempt at inclusion.

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